Life is choices and the first one for the Christian is often difficult.

 

The Choice

by Lorele Yager

 

 

Scene I

Two persons are seated, talking infrequently,
obviously depressed. Mary is holding a newspaper.

 

Sharon:
  
I suppose they told you the news today, too.
  
Mary:
  
  
Yes, but I just donít believe it. I only came to this hospital for a checkup because my job demanded it.
  
Sharon:
  
  
  
Itís hard for me to believe, too. I go to parties, ball games, and all kinds of fun things all the time besides working full time. I feel so good. I just canít believe Iím going to die. Just what did the doctors say to you?
  
Mary:
  
  
  
  
Probably the same as they told you. They said I have an incurable disease that will cause unbelievable suffering that will seem to go on forever. It just isnít possible. If there is such a disease and if I have it, there must be a cure for it. They have all kinds of cures these days. (Unfold newspaper in an abstracted way.)
  
Sharon:
  
  
  
It certainly is hard to accept when we feel so good and enjoy life so much. But what can we do? There doesnít seem to be much hope. It is the suffering that I am afraid of. Iíve had things easy all my life and I like to have fun. Iím just not very brave.
  
Mary:
  
  
Well, the old saying is, "There is always hope." (Glance at newspaper and become obviously excited.) You see! What did I just say! Theyíve found a cure!
  
Sharon:
  
  
  
  
What? Let me see that! (Grab paper.) Youíre right! Itís unbelievable! Just in time for us. Thereís a whole article here about it. (Read the paper.) It says that the research has been going on for years ..... that it will be available next month ..... and that each dose will cost ..... Oh, no! ..... two million dollars.
  
Mary:
  
  
Thatís impossible. (Grab paper)   Nothing costs two million dollars.   (Study paper)   But (Sigh deeply)  that is what it says.
  
Sharon:
  
Can you get that much money?
  
Mary:
  
  
Donít be foolish. How would anyone do that except by robbing a bank. I donít have that kind of friends or that kind of insurance.
  
Sharon:
  
  
Oh, this is worse than before, to know there is a cure for all that suffering and not be able to afford it. It is so hard to accept.
  
Mary:
  
  
Yes, it certainly is depressing. The cure should be available to everyone. (Sigh.) Guess Iíll go to my room. Maybe Iíll see you later.
  

(Both exit.)


 

Scene II

Both enter from different directions.

 

Mary:
  
Did you get any mail today?
  
Sharon:
  
Yes, did you?
  
Mary:
  
(Dully) Yes, it was a letter from a man who offered to pay for my cure.
  
Sharon:
  
  
  
(Excitedly) Mine must be just like yours. Can you imagine that? Someone is willing to pay that price to save someone he doesnít even know from all that suffering. Itís unbelievable! Can you imagine it?
  
Mary:
  
No. I canít imagine it. Did you finish reading the letter? Thereís a catch to it.
  
Sharon:
  
  
Yes, I read all of it. But it seems to me that the so-called catch makes the offer even better because he wants us to live in his house, eat his food, be his friend, and share his love.
  
Mary:
  
The guy is trying to buy friends. I donít need that kind of friends.
  
Sharon:
  
  
  
  
I donít agree. Heís willing to pay the same for both of us. He is offering us life. Donít you understand that? If we go on the way we are and do not accept his offer we will surely die and with all that suffering. But this is a wonderful chance to live. And no one gets that kind of payment easily. He must have spent his life preparing to save ours.
  
Mary:
  
  
  
He s got to be weird! If you accept his offer your whole life will be different and people will make fun of you as well as him. To give your whole life to him just because he saved it is asking too much. Besides, I like my life the way it is.
  
Sharon:
  
  
  
  
Maybe parties, ball games, and work arenít all there is to living. If he cares enough to do all that for me, maybe my life needs to be changed to his way and I ll be able to care for others, too, even those who laugh. Besides, weíll have the support of the others who have accepted his offer and become his friends. I m going to contact him immediately and accept his gift.
  
Mary:
  
Well, not me. Iíll just take my chances and wait for a cure that doesnít cost me so much.
  
 

(Both exit.)

 

CURTAIN


from the booklet
Acts of Choice:
Evangelism and Renewal Skits and Plays for Local Congregations

by Lorele Yager

Produced by the Evangelism Office of the Church of the Brethren